Nov 07

Matthew Lounsberry: NCAA finally determines Miami sanctions

Nearly four years after its violations were reported, the University of Miami finally has an answer to the type of sanctions it will face with its football and basketball programs due to its “lack of institutional control.”

The fact that the decision on the “Nevin Shapiro scandal” took years to be determined has been a hot topic among critics of the NCAA. Britton Banowsky, chair of the NCAA Committee on Infractions, attempted to explain why the process took so long in an article written by ESPN’s Andrea Adelson:

“Typically, we’re able to turn around reports in a six- to eight-week period of time, which is what we hoped to do,” Banowsky said. “Unfortunately, the case not only lasted three-plus years in the investigation stage but also had a lot of complexities to it that were extraordinary. The sheer volume of the case was enormous, so our first responsibility is to do the best we can to understand the case record and to get it right. We like to do it in a rapid way as well, but that’s not always possible.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Permanent link to this article: http://thewashingtonjournalismcenter.com/?p=8680

Oct 28

WJC alum Sari Heidenreich on writing ledes and moving to Jerusalem

WJC alum now lives in Jerusalem, working for Best Semester’s Middle East Studies Program

WJC alum Sari Heidenreich lives in Jerusalem, working with BestSemester’s Middle East Studies Program.

Sari Heidenreich attended WJC during Spring 2010. Today she lives in Jerusalem, Israel, working for Best Semester’s Middle East Studies Program. Read the following Q&A to learn a little more about Sari’s life after WJC.

To start off, tell us a little about your path from WJC to the workplace.

Well, I just changed jobs, actually. In the beginning of August I moved to Jerusalem to be the program assistant for the Middle East Studies Program, which I attended as a student a year after WJC. So, my path to this current job was pretty straightforward: I studied here in the Spring of 2011, was out of college for a year and working in journalism when I got an email saying they were hiring for this position. It stirred something inside of me and I decided to apply, ya know, just to see what would happen! Five months later, here I am. Read the rest of this entry »

Permanent link to this article: http://thewashingtonjournalismcenter.com/?p=8603

Oct 14

Claire Sloan: $4.73 and 45 minutes

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Task force members meet at City Hall to decide the future of a historic federal homeless shelter.

Every other Tuesday is production day at Street Sense, the street newspaper where I intern, which means I’m normally staring at a computer screen 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. or later if I can stay.  I edit stories, design the layout of some of the newspaper pages and write last-minute news briefs.

Production has to be my favorite day.

It’s tiring, thrilling, rewarding — all the elements of a well-spent day.

The morning began in the normal fashion, with multiple cups of pumpkin spice coffee (courtesy of my Mom — she’s the best) and layout design.  I learned how to work with Photoshop.  Always a new challenge. Read the rest of this entry »

Permanent link to this article: http://thewashingtonjournalismcenter.com/?p=8607

Oct 02

The federal shutdown: Watching from front-row seats

Katherine Burgess (left), WJC student, and Anika Janzen, ASP student, visited the United States Capitol on the night of the federal shutdown.

Katherine Burgess (left), WJC student, and Anika Janzen, ASP student, visited the United States Capitol on the night of the federal shutdown.

As the clock ticked to midnight and the United States waited for an inevitable government shutdown, another intern and I watched the story unfold from the heart of the Capitol Building.

Neither ASPer Anika Janzen, an intern for the U.S. Attorney’s Office, nor I remember exactly how we decided to head to the Capitol at 10:30 p.m. on the night of the shutdown. Maybe we merely grew tired of watching everything on the news, knowing it was happening mere blocks away.

But an hour and a half before the shutdown we headed to the Capitol Building, dressed in business casual outfits and hoping we wouldn’t give ourselves away as wide-eyed interns who merely wanted to see what was going on.

“So how serious are you about trying to get inside?” I asked Anika on the way.

She was serious. Butterflies in our stomachs, we headed to the nearest official business entrance.

I’ve had people all over the media tell me to, when in doubt, pretend I know exactly what I’m doing. Anika and I pretended marvelously. Read the rest of this entry »

Permanent link to this article: http://thewashingtonjournalismcenter.com/?p=8584

Sep 24

WJC alum Kimberlee Kruesi on covering the Idaho wildfires and loving journalism

 

While covering wildfires, Kimberlee Kruesi lives out of her car wearing fire gear and praying for cell service. This photo was snapped at a fire training exercise right before the Idaho wildfires hit the region.

While covering wildfires, WJC alum and Kimberlee Kruesi lives out of her car, wearing fire gear and praying for cell service. This photo was snapped at a fire training exercise right before the Idaho wildfires hit the region.

Kimberlee Kruesi attended the Washington Journalism Center during the Fall of 2009. After graduating from Point Loma Nazarene University in San Diego, she now lives in Twin Falls, Idaho, where she chases both wildfires and city officials as a reporter for the Times-News in Twin Falls, Idaho.

To start off, tell us a little about your path from WJC to the workplace.

I spent my semester at WJC interning at Market News International. It was a grueling internship, but it taught me to be fearless. By my senior year, I was working two internships and as the news editor at my college newspaper. I made a promise to myself earlier that year I would apply for any and every job that appealed to me without giving a second thought to the location. When I saw an opening for an environmental and health reporter at the Times-News in Twin Falls, Idaho, I would have bet money I wasn’t going to get it, but I applied anyway because it was my dream to work in environmental journalism. I was so sure I wasn’t going to get the job, I forgot I even applied. When the editor called me a week later asking for an interview, I bluffed my way through the first five minutes trying to remember where I had applied. So, pro tip: Remember where you apply, they might call you. Anywho, after two phone interviews, the newspaper flew me out to interview in person and two days later they offered me the position. Two and a half years later, I’m still at the paper and I couldn’t be happier. Read the rest of this entry »

Permanent link to this article: http://thewashingtonjournalismcenter.com/?p=8566

Sep 09

Fall ’13 students explore their new city in Bus Day I

Ramanda Lazaris and Whitney Waters explored the National Press Club in search of a piano played by President Harry Truman.

WJC students Ramanda Lazaris and Whitney Waters explored the National Press Club in search of the piano played by President Harry Truman.

During their first weekend in Washington, D.C., WJC students walked four miles to Georgetown, explored the National Press Club building and stopped at a food truck to eat a half-smoke.

All were activities during the semester’s first “Bus Day,” a scavenger hunt during which students travel in teams throughout the city in search of specific items, places and adventures.

One team visited the Old Post Office Pavilion, riding a glass elevator to the bell tower that boasts the best view of the city.

Another team missed their bus stop, ending up in Georgetown while in search of the original Jumbo Slice Pizza.

Students saw the hat Abraham Lincoln wore when assassinated, visited the church President Barack Obama attends in D.C., acted out scenes from National Treasure and visited the hotel where Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote the “I have a dream” speech.

Along the way they met other D.C. residents — from security guards to ballet students — and learned a little more about the city.

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://thewashingtonjournalismcenter.com/?p=8502

Sep 03

Alumnus Interview: Jordan Otero, Fall 2011

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Jordan Otero is a WJC alum from Fall 2011. She is currently a senior at Franciscan University in Steubenville, Ohio and spent the summer as an investigative reporting intern for the blog “Raising Hale”  in East Hartford, Connecticut. We interviewed her to hear her thoughts on life after WJC!

To start off, tell us a little about your path from WJC to the workplace.

Well, I’m still a student at Franciscan; I plan on graduating in May 2014 (I did WJC a little early, as a first-semester sophomore). Coming back to Ohio after my D.C. semester, I noticed that my passion for journalism and telling stories had grown substantially. I also narrowed my interests a little bit – the semester I got returned, I added a political science minor to my degree. A big factor in this move was that I had decided that I definitely want to move back to D.C. after graduation. I thought having at least a little background in political science would be really beneficial for reporting in the Beltway. Read the rest of this entry »

Permanent link to this article: http://thewashingtonjournalismcenter.com/?p=8472

Aug 08

Meet Kelley, the new DC Programs administrator

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Kelley works with both the Washington Journalism Center and the American Studies Program on recruitment, admissions and semester activities.

Kelley Griffin graduated in May 2013 with a major in American Studies from Erskine College in Due West, South Carolina (you’ve likely never heard of Erskine or Due West.  That’s okay—she’s used to it.) Being born and raised in the South means that she enjoys making sweet tea, cooking big family dinners, and using words like “y’all.”

Thanks to being a Fall ’11 alum of the American Studies Program, Kelley loves living in Washington, D.C., particularly when she has the opportunity to explore the city’s book stores and coffee shops.  Her long-term plans involve going to grad school for American History and later teaching at the college level.

In her spare time, you can probably find Kelley reading old books, watching British television, daydreaming about traveling the world, or watching SEC football.

Permanent link to this article: http://thewashingtonjournalismcenter.com/?p=8489

Apr 10

WJC/ASP students team up for neighborhood photo ministry

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WJC students Caleb Bell (Lee University) and Lanie Rivera (Westmont College) take photos of Crisis Pregnancy Center clients and their families.

Although Washington Journalism Center students often volunteer at the Capitol Hill Crisis Pregnancy Center (CHCPC) as part of the semester’s Neighborhood Engagement component, it is not often that we get to interact with the clients who visit the center. But on April 7, 2013, some of us were able to meet these people, hear their stories and learn about their lives.

The CHCPC photo ministry was inspired by similar projects, and it seemed like an outlet to serve the surrounding community while using God’s given passions and privileges.

 

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On Sunday, April 7, three students and I walked over to Stanton Park on Capitol Hill. We photographed three families, but I think we provided more than just nice photos – we gave self-confidence, excitement for the future and an enjoyable afternoon in the sun.

Although the day was planned well in advance (I pitched the idea to the WJC/ASP professors, the day was organized with CHCPC and other student volunteers were gathered), the extent to which the ministry blessed each one of us was surprising.

We connected with each person and child, and we were also able to celebrate each family by showing them their beautiful photographs. The expression on their faces when they reviewed the photos on the camera was priceless — they were astonished and proud.

To see more photos from the day, follow this link.

*Photos by ASP student Jacob Bechtol

Permanent link to this article: http://thewashingtonjournalismcenter.com/?p=8459

Apr 08

SP ’13 visits The Washington Post

Photo Credit: Lanie Rivera

WJC Spring 2013, with program coordinator Rose Creasman Welcome
Photo Credit: Lanie Rivera

WJC students took a tour of the Washington Post this past week on April 5th, 2013. Students were guided by Washington Post tour guide Timothy Smith, and were able to witness the Post newsroom on a typical work day.

Students sat in on a planning meeting among executive editors, and saw an historic copy of one of the Post’s most famous front pages: the Watergate cover-up.

The tour was coordinated by WJC mentor Mike Plunkett, who works on the Washington Post design desk.

After the tour, Terry and Rose treated students to a burger and fries at the nearby Post Pub.

Permanent link to this article: http://thewashingtonjournalismcenter.com/?p=8452

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